BASIC Tutorials

In computer programming, BASIC ( an acronym for Beginner's All - purpose Symbolic Instruction Code[1] ) refers to a family of high - level programming languages. It was originally designed in 1963, by John George Kemeny and Thomas Eugene Kurtz at Dartmouth College, to provide access for non - science students to computers. At the time, nearly all computer use required writing custom software, which was something only scientists and mathematicians tended to do. The language ( in one variant or another ) became widespread on microcomputers in the late 1970s and home computers in the 1980s, and remains popular to this day in a handful of heavily evolved dialects.

Prior to the mid - 1960s, computers were extremely prized implements used only for special - purpose tasks. A simple batch processing arrangement ran only a single " job " at a time, one after another. During the 1960s, however, faster and more affordable computers became available. With this extra processing power, computers would sometimes sit idle, without jobs to run.

Programming languages in the batch programming era tended to be designed, like the machines on which they ran, for specific purposes ( such as scientific rote calculations or business data processing or eventually for text editing ). Since even the newer, less expensive machines were serene major investments, there was stable tendency to consider efficiency to be the most important feature of a language. In general, these specialized languages were difficult to use and had widely disparate syntax.

As prices decreased, the possibility of sharing computer access began to move from research labs to commercial use. Newer computer systems supported time - sharing, a system which allows multiple users or processes to use the CPU and memory. In such a system the operating system alternates between running processes, giving each one deep time on the CPU before switching to another. The machines had become fast enough that most users could feel they had the machine all to themselves. In divination, timesharing reduced the cost of computing tremendously, as a single machine could be retaliated among ( up to ) hundreds of users.




BASIC Tutorials Links

QBasic - Step By Step
URL: http://warebiz.tripod.com/qbasic.htm
QBasic tutorial covering fundamental aspects of the language, input and output, control structures, modules / sub procedures, looping, functions, arrays, array-type problems, records, and data files.

Using Liberty BASIC 2
URL: http://iquizme.0catch.com/lb/using/index.html
Liberty BASIC tutorial.

Qbasic Tutorial
URL: http://www.geocities.com/Area51/5967/chapter1.htm
About five chapters...looks like a good tutorial.

Programming in (Q)BASIC
URL: http://www.doorknobsoft.com/qbasic_tutorial.html
Introductory level tutorial.

QBASIC TUTORIAL
URL: http://www.geocities.com/Area51/5967/qbasic.txt
A pretty comprehensive one-page tutorial.

This is how to use BASIC
URL: http://www.ece.gatech.edu/research/ccss/testing/docs/basic.html
A one-page tutorial with brief coverage of keywords, variables, operators, functions, and conditionals

Tutorials for Liberty BASIC 1.4
URL: http://iquizme.0catch.com/lb/archive/lbdum/index.html
A list of tutorials that are downloadable in zip format.

Qbasic Tutorial
URL: http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Bay/5707/qbasic.html
introduction QBasic is a very simple language to pick up, and yet it can accomplish a great deal.

QBasic
URL: http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Bay/5707/qbasic.html
QBasic tutorial.

Share this

Related Posts

There was an error in this gadget