Cobol Tutorials

COBOL is a third-generation programming language , and one of the oldest programming languages still in active use. Its name is an acronym for Common Business - Oriented Language, defining its primary domain in business, finance, and administrative systems for companies and governments.

The COBOL 2002 standard includes support for object - oriented programming and other modern language features.

COBOL was initially created in 1959 by The Short Range Committee, one of three committees proposed at a meeting held at the Pentagon on May 28 and 29, 1959, organized by Charles Phillips of the United States Department of Defense ( exactly one year after the Zürich ALGOL 58 meeting ). The Short Range Committee was formed to recommend a short range approach to a common business language. It was made up of members representing six computer manufacturers and three dominion agencies.

In particular, the six computer manufacturers were Burroughs Corporation, IBM, Minneapolis - Honeywell ( Honeywell Labs ), RCA, Sperry Rand, and Sylvania Electric Produce. The three oversight agencies were the US Air Force, the David Taylor Model Basin, and the National Bureau of Standards ( Now NIST ). This committee was chaired by a member of the NBS. An Intermediate - Range Committee and a Long - Range Committee were proposed at the Pentagon nooner as well. However although the Intermediate Range Committee was formed, it was never operational; and the Long - Range Committee was never even formed. In the end a sub - committee of the Short Range Committee developed the specifications of the COBOL language. This sub - committee was made up of six individuals:

William Selden and Gertrude Tierney of IBM
Howard Bromberg and Howard Discount of RCA
Vernon Reeves and Jean E. Sammet of Sylvania Electric Products

This subcommittee completed the specifications for COBOL as the year of 1959 concluded. The specifications were to a great extent inspired by the FLOW - MATIC language invented by Grace Hopper, commonly referred to as " the titanic of the COBOL language ", and the IBM COMTRAN language invented by Bob Bemer.

The specifications approved by the full Short Range Committee were approved by the Executive Committee on January 3 1960, and sent to the government printing office, which edited and printed these specifications as Cobol 60.

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has since produced several revisions of the COBOL standard, including

COBOL-68
COBOL-74
COBOL-85
COBOL 2002



Cobol Tutorials Links

ZingCOBOL
URL: http://members.lycos.co.uk/ZingCOBOL/
A beginners guide to programming in COBOL.

COBOL programming - tutorials, lectures, exercises, examples
URL: http://www.csis.ul.ie/cobol/default.htm
COBOL programming site with a comprehensive set of COBOL tutorials making a full COBOL course as well as COBOL lecture notes, COBOL programming exercises with sample solutions, COBOL programming exam specifications with model answers, COBOL project specif

COBOL programming -
URL: http://www.csis.ul.ie/COBOL/
tutorials, lectures, exercises, examples

Tutorials for Fujitsu COBOL
URL: http://www.adtools.com/support/v3tutorial/


COBOL lectures and tutorials
URL: http://www.csis.ul.ie/cobol/lectures/default.htm
These pages contain the COBOL programming lectures and tutorials for CS4312 - Software Engineering 2

Cobol tutorial with example Code
URL:http://www.cs.uregina.ca/dept/manuals/Manuals/7Language/7_5Cobol/7_5COBOL_ToC.html
This appears to be a somewhat dated Cobol tutorial.

CSC1140 Introduction to COBOL
URL: http://www.cs.wayne.edu/~jcc/CSC114/lec.html
Lecture Notes

Object Oriented COBOL
URL: http://home.swbell.net/mck9/cobol/ooc/ooc.html
These pages will be best understood by those who are already familiar with the OO paradigm in general, and C++ in particular, as well as COBOL.

Cobol Tutorial
URL: http://www.techiwarehouse.com/Cobol/Cobol_Tutorial.html
One page tutorial.

The Kasten COBOL Page
URL: http://home.swbell.net/mck9/cobol/cobol.html
Would you like to try some of the tricks that are so common in C and other languages? You can. With a reasonably modern dialect of COBOL, and a little ingenuity, you can do almost anything that a C programmer can do

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