Difference between specify the system sleep timeout vs specify the unattended sleep timeout"

Can someone explain the difference between the following two sleep setting: "specify the system sleep timeout" vs "specify the unattended sleep timeout" other than what is stated in the explanations.

The unattended sleep timeout explanation states "when a user is not present at the computer." The other states a period of inactivity.

My assumption is that unattended sleep timeout refers to when there is no one logged into the system and the other refers to when someone is actually logged in? Just wanted to see if that was correct.



This may help you better understand the difference, of what it is:
"System unattended sleep timeout" is how many minutes the system will wait idle after waking up in an unattended state before automatically going back to sleep or hibernation.

If the computer wakes up from sleep mode and is not used by you and is idle, then it will go back to sleep mode after this timeout period.



This may help you better understand the difference, of what it is:
"System unattended sleep timeout" is how many minutes the system will wait idle after waking up in an unattended state before automatically going back to sleep or hibernation.

If the computer wakes up from sleep mode and is not used by you and is idle, then it will go back to sleep mode after this timeout period.



Totally had the wrong idea of what it was. Can you give a an example of what would wake a system up from sleep mode? I assume you are referring to something other than a human doing something like jiggling the mouse.



let say it is in sleep mode and if the network card has the ability to wake the system up and if it does and there is no activity that timeout will come into effect, if nothing else happens, no logging in, not typing -- the system will then go back into sleep mode based on the System unattended sleep timeout. does that help?



Yes. Good explanation. Thanks



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