Receiving errors on ODBC (Pervasive DB) on Server 2008 R2

Here's a brief scenario of what's going on presently:
Server 1 is reports dropping error on Pervassive DB (ODBC connection) on a Windows Server 2008 R2. When we switched over to Server 2 which sits on the exact, supposedly, server hardware as server 1, we do not witness any issues/errors. Went back onto Server 1 again and errors report again. Once again we switched to server 2 and rebooted server 1. No errors to report as of now.

Any utilities windows server 2008 R2 offer to assist in the troubleshooting of these errors? I understand Server 2008 R2 is supposed to be filled with built in utilities for a bunch of things.

I was thinking of running I/O meter to verify if I can witness anything, but we're restricted on running anything outside of the MS world.



Any "dropped connections" are likely caused by networking problems. Check the PVSW.LOG on the server and on the client to see what kinds of errors are being reported and what time of day they are seen.

It could be a simple cabling issue (try replacing cable, check port configuration on switch, etc.), a problem with throughput (such as during backups or other heavy network activity), a problem with the NIC or driver (try updating the driver, switching to an alternate NIC if available), etc.

If it helps, there is a paper on testing your network connection with the Pervasive System Analyzer located here:http://www.goldstarsoftware.com/whitepapers-troubleshooting.asp
Be sure to read the paper to know how to analyze the results.

You can also use FPING (from qwakkelflap) to test like this:FPING computername -t 0 -s 32000 -n 1000
If you see dropped packets, then you have a networking issue. This is nice because you can test to ANY two computers, without involving Pervasive at all.



Any "dropped connections" are likely caused by networking problems. Check the PVSW.LOG on the server and on the client to see what kinds of errors are being reported and what time of day they are seen.

It could be a simple cabling issue (try replacing cable, check port configuration on switch, etc.), a problem with throughput (such as during backups or other heavy network activity), a problem with the NIC or driver (try updating the driver, switching to an alternate NIC if available), etc.

If it helps, there is a paper on testing your network connection with the Pervasive System Analyzer located here:http://www.goldstarsoftware.com/whitepapers-troubleshooting.asp
Be sure to read the paper to know how to analyze the results.

You can also use FPING (from qwakkelflap) to test like this:FPING computername -t 0 -s 32000 -n 1000
If you see dropped packets, then you have a networking issue. This is nice because you can test to ANY two computers, without involving Pervasive at all.



Great info!

Is there anything within the MS world that could assist with this?



Not sure what you mean by "MS world" -- are you talking built-in OS tools only? The Microsoft version of PING just doesn't work for a network stress test. This is a flaw of the tool itself. You can call Microsoft and ask them to fix this (so that it has capabilities like FPING), but I am doubtful that they will be able to fix it in a reasonable time-frame.

If your NIC driver displays error statistics, you can look at those. If you see FCS Errors, Checksum errors, etc., then this is a bad link. If you have a managed switch, then you should be able to look at the same on the switch ports -- in fact, this maybe much more reliable that the OS statistics.

There is a Microsoft tool that can capture network packets -- called Network Monitor. It is built-in, but not installed by default, to the server OS platforms. You could try this. However, I don't know if it is smart enough to detect any network retransmissions and display them for you, or if you will have to memorize the packet list and detect retransmissions on your own. Again, Microsoft is unlikely to update this tool, since the open-source Wireshark solution works SO much better...





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